How Does Ivory and Old Bones Become Fossils?

by ani.choudhary on November 23, 2014

With the great demand of different ivories, especially after the elephant ivory ban, most people know about fossil ivory. It is usually found in Siberia, Alaska and Canada. Though it is in abundance, it can be mined by anyone who has a permit to mine in these regions. Usually found embedded in the permafrost or in the trash piles of old Eskimo villages, ivory objects have always been treasured.

The reason that ivory is usually mentioned as fossil ivory is because with time and pressure on organic materials, they mineralize as fossils. As minerals are carried by water, it permeates deep into the empty cells of organic matter and gets buried there. With time, all empty cellular space is filled with tiny mineral deposits, giving it a stone like look. But even if it doesn’t get a stone like feel, the minerals color the pure ivory, giving it different hues and color pigmentation. Most of the time, quartz, silica and calcite are few of the minerals that get deposit into the organic material and recrystallization begins. Over thousands of years, organic material is slowly replaced. This happens over time with bones, trees and any other organic materials that does not decay.

Other ivory that is used is vegetable ivory that is sourced from the Tagua seed in South America and African sub-continent. Ivory is associated with medical use since ancient times and even the fossil ivory was carried around with ancient tribesmen and people as sacred charms. If youa re looking for mammoth ivory artifacts, sculptures and even fossilized ivory check out the most unique collection at amazing prices at http://www.mammothivory.info

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Has Mammoth Tusk Ivory Trade Protected Elephants?

by ani.choudhary on August 31, 2014

Chances are high that climatic changes and hunting perused the wooly mammoths to extinction and now they are again looking to hunt the carcasses to harvest the huge tusks. As the climate grows warmer and the permafrost melts, it has exposed thousands of tusks and the growing mammoth ivory trade is prospering.

Every year about 60 metric tons of pure and legal mammoth tusk ivory is traded and it does not come cheap. According to the current prices, a good quality, 10 feet tusk can fetch a price of about $250,000 which is lucrative to the hunters and traders in the Arctic and Alaskan regions. The intense demand for mammoth ivory is due to the rising profits and ban on elephant ivory. China has high demand for ivory due to its use in traditional medicine and ornamental value of lustrous ivory.  With more people opting for natural ivory which is legal and ethical, there has been a tremendous demand globally. With it replacing elephant ivory, elephants are already being protected. As this is legitimate ivory, there is no requirement for smuggling it into any country but people can own it proudly.

With millions of mammoth still waiting to be excavated, most of them were 5 meters and weighted about 12 tons. They are buried mostly in the region of Alaska and Siberia, and trade in mammoth ivory is here to stay. However, it may surprise some people but mammoth tusk ivory is not a new trade. People in Yakuytia, a mineral rich in Siberia have been mining tusks for decades. Now people are using modern technology to search for the buried tusks as it is more profitable than mining gold.

 

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Is My Heirloom Ivory Legal?

by ani.choudhary on July 2, 2014

We receive a host of queries about trying to sell heirloom ivory online. However, the fact remains that whether the ivory you own is legal or not depends upon the ivory that you have. Only mammoth tusk ivory and fossil ivories are considered legal for trade. So if you are looking to sell pre-ban antique elephant ivory, chances are high that you won’t be able to sell it easily as current laws ban trade in elephant ivory in most countries. The difficulty is in proving provenance of the ivory sculpture that you own. If you have the requisite paperwork and can prove that it was bought before the ban was applied, you might be able to sell it only in countries that do not adhere to the C.I.T.E.S laws.

A few months ago, many states within US passed a new law that completely bans all trade in elephant ivory regardless of whether it was bought in 1800s or legally. This was done to stop the illegal trade in elephant ivory that continues to illegally flourish in many nations in Asia and Africa. As more countries adhere to the stringent policies and laws relating to elephant trade ban, the demand is fulfilled by mammoth ivory.

If you have mammoth ivory product or sculpture, you can sell it to a store, online or even on auction websites. The real reason that mammoth ivory is legal for sale and purchase is due to the fact that no animal is harmed to harvest the ivory as wooly mammoths are extinct. Globally, it is the only legal ivory which is sourced in Arctic and Siberia and carved in China and Hong Kong before it is purchased by ivory-lovers worldwide. To see a beautiful collection of hand crafted, legal and organic mammoth ivory sculptures, check out the collection at http://www.mammothivory.info

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Old Secret Techniques of Hand Painting Mammoth Ivory

by ani.choudhary on June 22, 2014

Doesn’t the hand-painted mammoth ivory look realistic? Well, the main reason is that ivory requires light water colors to remain translucent yet retain the color over ivory. The art of painting on mammoth ivory started in the 1700s though elephant ivory was equally in vogue. The sheets of ivory were wafer like and the thickness was just 1 mm, making the sheets completely translucent.

As watercolors were non-greasy and not absorbed by ivory with ease, it was difficult to make the colors stick on the ivory permanently. The artists started roughing the surface of the ivory using sand paper which helped to retain the color. They bleached the ivory in the sun to make it whiter while other de-greased the ivory by treating it with garlic and vinegar. To add more stickiness to the watercolors, Arabic gums were added while more conservative artists used bile from the gall bladder of the bulls, which allowed the paints to flow better.

However, before painting on ivory, the thin sheets of mammoth ivory need to be kept at a certain humidity levels and constant low temperatures to ensure that it does not crack or turn brittle. Most of the artists working with mammoth ivory of any for use a soft cotton cloth to cover the sheets even in a dark room. Most of the longer sheets are sliced vertically while the shorter ones for portraits and miniatures which were popular in the 18th century were oval as the horizontal slicing were done, to fit into lockets and frames. Check out some of the most beautiful hand painted and carved collection of pure and legal mammoth ivory at http://www.mammothivory.info

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Is Mammoth Ivory Still Available?

by ani.choudhary on April 19, 2014

The most amazing aspect of mammoth ivory is that it is always in vogue. Ever since the 17th century when it was used to craft jewelry pieces and raw material for miniature paintings, mammoth ivory use has been traced to ancient civilizations. However, the question arises, whether mammoth ivory is available and for how long will it be available?

Considering the limited resources that are available and constant excavations in the Arctic regions is leading to quick depletion of the tusks. However as per the experts there are still thousands of carcasses buried deep inside the Tundra regions and equal amount in the higher regions of China. Alaska has large reserves of the buried and extinct wooly mammoths and native Eskimos have been using mammoth ivory in place of wood for support since eons.

But it was only after 1989 when the elephant ivory was banned that mammoth ivory came into focus. Mammoth ivory is in great demand in traditional Chinese medicines. Apart from that China is the hub of expert artists that have experience working with ivory. From carving complete mammoth tusks weighing over 40 kg to sculpting tiny netsuke as collectibles, there are a wide range of art and creativity that can be shown in ivory.

Even though mammoth ivory is precious and rare, there are experienced artists that take weeks and months to create astoundingly beautiful sculptures carving through the different layers of ivory. Using woodworking tools and tiny drills, some of the most delicate and exquisite designs have been carved in mammoth ivory. To see some of the beautiful works of art, check out http://www.mammothivory.info

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