Is Mammoth Ivory Still Available?

by ani.choudhary on April 19, 2014

The most amazing aspect of mammoth ivory is that it is always in vogue. Ever since the 17th century when it was used to craft jewelry pieces and raw material for miniature paintings, mammoth ivory use has been traced to ancient civilizations. However, the question arises, whether mammoth ivory is available and for how long will it be available?

Considering the limited resources that are available and constant excavations in the Arctic regions is leading to quick depletion of the tusks. However as per the experts there are still thousands of carcasses buried deep inside the Tundra regions and equal amount in the higher regions of China. Alaska has large reserves of the buried and extinct wooly mammoths and native Eskimos have been using mammoth ivory in place of wood for support since eons.

But it was only after 1989 when the elephant ivory was banned that mammoth ivory came into focus. Mammoth ivory is in great demand in traditional Chinese medicines. Apart from that China is the hub of expert artists that have experience working with ivory. From carving complete mammoth tusks weighing over 40 kg to sculpting tiny netsuke as collectibles, there are a wide range of art and creativity that can be shown in ivory.

Even though mammoth ivory is precious and rare, there are experienced artists that take weeks and months to create astoundingly beautiful sculptures carving through the different layers of ivory. Using woodworking tools and tiny drills, some of the most delicate and exquisite designs have been carved in mammoth ivory. To see some of the beautiful works of art, check out http://www.mammothivory.info

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How Much Does Carved Mammoth Ivory Tusk Cost?

by ani.choudhary on April 3, 2014

This is a very common question that we are asked oftentimes about the real cost of a mammoth tusk. However, the answer varies because the cost of buying a raw tusk will differ from a carved and polished tusk that is ready for display. The complete process of locating and excavating a mammoth ivory tusk from the harsh permafrost in the Arctic regions is time consuming and painstaking and add to it the cost of transportation, there is a direct price increase.

After the raw mammoth tusk is sent out to artists and sculptors, the price increases as they spend weeks or even a month sometimes to carve out the complete design. The cost increases and most of the well-carved and polished tusks cost anywhere between $10,000 to $60,000 easily, depending upon the size, weight and color of the tusk, apart from the amount of carving done upon it.

Looking at the available options and depending upon your budget, investment in mammoth ivory is profitable as there is limited supply. Whether you can buy a complete tusk or prefer collecting mammoth ivory netsuke or other figurines costing less, mammoth ivory is a priceless material. It is a part of history in your hands. Look for art pieces, figurines and even sculptures that suit your taste and budget, because after all, mammoth ivory is chic, elegant and in limited supply. But ensure that you only buy from a reputed dealer and you can check online for reviews and feedback easily. Check out one of the largest range of mammoth ivory products including netsuke, mammoth ivory tusks, and sculptures at http://www.mammothivory.info

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Making of Mammoth Ivory Jewelry

by ani.choudhary on March 10, 2014

Not just sculptures, but mammoth ivory is one of the favorite medium for making jewelry among a host of other products. Artists use scrap ivory to craft small pendants, earrings and mammoth ivory beads, there is a large market for beautiful yet small-sized ivory jewelry. The ivory is teamed with silver, gold setting and adorned with opals, agates, zircon, pearls and a host of other semi-precious gems to accentuate the beauty of the jewelry.

The artists first carve the tiny ivory scraps into tiny sculptures while the jewelers embellish them with the metal and gemstones, polish it and it is ready to be worn. This amazing mammoth ivory bead necklace is one of the most exquisite pieces of jewelry sold at the reputed mammoth ivory store. As you can see, the beads are crafted from genuine mammoth ivory, while the varied pigmentation of soil minerals that the tusk absorbed can be seen clearly. Then the raw ivory tusk scraps are crafted and polished as beads, carved and etched with tiny details and holes.

Notice the beautiful color, polish and etchings, giving it a rustic look. The different sized beads and cylindrical beads close together with gold lock, is a product of delicate craftsmanship. The different shaped beads are hand carved, polished and then beaded together.  Sometimes the raw exterior bark is removed, before the white ivory is used to craft the sculptures and scraps used to carve small jewelry pieces, but here the bark has been left and can be seen as a black accent on one bead. These high quality pure mammoth ivory beads and other jewelry pieces make a unique piece in your jewelry collection while accentuating the beauty of your dress. Take a look at uniquely carved collection of mammoth ivory products at http://www.mammothivory.info

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Do C.I.T.E.S laws apply on ivory trade?

by ani.choudhary on February 25, 2014

The C.I.T.E.S. (Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species) regulates the ivory trade under the International and U.S Fish and Wildlife laws. The regulatory body was formed in 1973 under the UN and keeps a tab on the endangered animals and plants. As per the specific laws regulating the ivory trade, here is a summary on mammoth ivory and mastodon. Mastodon was another ancient, extinct animal which was shorter than mammoth yet had large tusks, which are used as fossil ivory for trade.

Though elephant ivory is banned worldwide, mammoth and mastodon ivory as it is extinct animal ivory is completely legal for sale, purchase and trade. Both of the animals perished 10,000-40,000 years ago and the harvested ivory which is usually found in the tundra regions of Siberia and Arctic are allowed for trade, under the stringent laws in US, Canada and all over the world.

The major distinguishing fact between elephant ivory, mastodon and mammoth ivory is the bisecting cross grain lines. All of the three types of ivory have varying cross grain lines that differ from each other.  Other ivories that are permitted under the C.I.T.E.S rules include protected hippo and warthog ivory but require documentation when importing or exporting it, but in US, it is legal to trade and deal interstate. Though the rest of the ivory trade is governed under stringent rules, only mammoth ivory is free for purchase and sale all over the world. From carving complete tusks to using smaller pieces for knives and handles, there are numerous reputed dealers selling of genuine mammoth ivory products. However, ensure the reputation of the dealers is good and the ivory that you intend buying. Check out a wide range of information and amazing range of carved mammoth tusks at http://www.mammothivory.info

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More About Legal Mammoth Ivory Trade and Products

by ani.choudhary on February 12, 2014

Isn’t something rarer than gold and oil worth being an heirloom? Well, that is exactly why mammoth ivory is precious because only a few thousand tusks are in existence and most of them have already been harvested. It is known that wooly mammoth tusks reached a length of 16 feet in many cases and archeological evidence of prehistoric artifacts of crudely crafted figurines have been found  in caves. Some of these ancient mammoth tusk carvings have been displayed in museums the world over.  However, the native Eskimos have been using mammoth tusks for a variety of purposes including skis, holding up the tents due to the lack of wood.

Though most of the ivory carvings are native to Arctic regions, as the wooly mammoths perished and got embalmed in the frozen tundra. Some of it absorbed the rich mineral deposits within the soil, giving a variety of hues to the milky white ivory. These hues range from light grey, browns to flicks of blue and green engrained into the organic ivory lends a beautiful effect when used in knife and pistol handles. Used by royalty all over the world, the exotic ivory has never lost its appeal.

Yet by the banning of the elephant ivory in 1989, mammoth ivory trade which only had 2% hold in the ivory market suddenly became one of the most sought after materials. As it is the only legal ivory that can be traded all over the world, the sculptors are in China and Japan, carving exquisite pieces and sculptures for sale worldwide. Check out some of these intricately hand crafted mammoth tusk ivory sculptures and fully carved tusks at http://www.mammothivory.info

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